Movie Reviews: Logan

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Logan is the movie everyone wanted to see at the beginning, not the end of the series. There is probably the least amount of special effects in this time than its predecessors that used it extensively in trying to hide poor acting, writing, and directing.

Logan is a adult film. Maybe not the first comic book adult film as many bandwagon fans seem to point out. At the core of the story, it is a character study of one man.

A broken man.

A man with claws. A Weapon X survivor. A man cursed by his healing powers.

He didn’t need to fight some old Samurai or Deadpool on top of a nuclear reactor to show who he was. He simply needed to fight for a reason. Something beyond himself. To become bigger than one character.

Wolverine needed to become Logan.

The film is great. The acting is great, even including the teenagers in the film. Just because it is a comic book movie doesn’t mean it is automatically made for easy translation and worldwide markets for teenagers around the world. Themes can still be dark. Acting can still trump special effects.

Maybe this is the last time we see Wolverine on screen. With Disney buying 20th Century Fox, I see it going two different ways. Either a full character reboot, or a boatload of cash for a couple more with Hugh Jackman.

For me, it will kind of be like Han Solo. There is only one in my book. It takes nearly flawless writing, acting, and directing to make us forget the previous role. The last time this happened for me was Christian Bale supplanting Michael Keaton as Batman. Then, in the sequel, Health Ledger supplanting Jack Nicholson. This was astounding to me. In the J.J. Abrams Star Trek reboot, this didn’t quite happen with Chris Pine and Captain Kirk. I’d describe the feeling as a cool rendition of the old man in the Captain’s chair. The movie was still good.

Logan was great. Maybe it’s the last time we see Hugh don the claws.

Maybe he saved the best for last.

Movie Rating: 10/10 Claws

Movie Reviews: Now You See Me 2

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Now You See Me 2 directed by Jon Chu

aka “Now You Can See the Casting Change”

What happens when Hollywood has an unexpected surprise hit with a relatively low budget cast?

Sequels happen.

What happens when the token hot girl doesn’t agree (likely over compensation) to appear in the sequel?

Hello Lizzy Caplan.

This seemed like the first 10 minutes was focused explaining this in some awfully written dialogue as if the audience needed to know the play by play. We’ve seen this plot device at the beginning of Karate Kid Part II and practically any sequel where there are casting issues. We have had 3 different Hulks in films, and Captain America was first part of the Fantastic Four. In Speed 2, Sandra had to take a cruise with someone else because “things simply didn’t work out.”

I call this cinematic weak-sauce.

Here is a hint Hollywood. Movie-goers can be smart too. They go to movies not because it is believable canon. (They put up with bumbling and unwatchable Finn in the new Star Wars) They want escapism, or want to fit in with friends, or take a date there, or have to watch over their kids. Nobody needs so much intro to explain why Robin William’s voice isn’t in The Return of Jafar. Reminding them someone isn’t there has the opposite effect!

I thought it would be a throwaway line. Nope. The first act is essentially trying painstakingly to make Lizzy Caplan to be likable by giving her all the clever lines and reactions.

They simply should have renamed the movie “Now Can You Please Like Her?”

On to the plot.

Nonsensical plot to try and link it back to the first one and come up with reasons for cast to return. The fun and cleverness and discovery in the first film is completely lost in this plot. It isn’t as if the first film was a masterpiece, but I hoped that with confidence in a franchise, and a larger budget, they could be bolder and expand what was started.

So what’s the plan for the third one? Gonna bring back Michael Caine once again?

On to the main question at hand; Did I like Lizzy Caplan?

Yes, but not for any reasons to do with the film.

Movie Rating: 3 Card Monty’s out of 10.