Thrift Treasures (The Bo Jackson Score)

I stopped by a Goodwill on the way home Monday and found something after 15 minutes. The store was a hot mess, but to me, this is where pickings are better; nobody knows what is going on there.

IMG_9476.JPG

This is the typical scene at this particular store. It is one of the worst ones for books. I rarely go in because they churn through so much (located next to a Burlington). So it was here I found an oldie but a goodie for those NFL fans of the late 1980s. Bo Jackson the duel threat phenom before he blew out his knee. IMG_9477.JPG

The only other thing I picked up was a first edition Stephen King book, Bag of Bones. There was nothing special about it other than I collect Stephen King Books. Unfortunately, since I collect all on memory now instead of stressing out with an inventory sheet, I found out I already had this book in first edition. On well, minus 99 cents unless I find someone else who likes him. IMG_9482.JPG

I combined this score with two other books I bought the previous weekend at a random quick stop. I found a pretty pristine copy of Sphere by Michael Crichton, a first edition, one of my favorite novels of all time (the movie was horrendous). I had found 4 BCE in the past, so this one stuck out to me from a quick scan. Can you see the difference? The real first edition has the reflective metallic details in the lettering. All I had to do was wipe off a few scuff marks (Like some random leaf or something in the O) and it looked like it came from the book launch. Believe it or not, a first edition Sphere runs around $45. All an all, another solid 1.99 purchase (a higher end thrift shop … grrr) IMG_9530.jpeg

The last book of my was a first edition of Legends. This is pretty much mandatory in every fantasy collector’s shelf. Just look at the authors. You’ve already seen Anne McCaffrey from my first autograph score. I have a Stephen King score from 12 years ago I can show if I ever hit a dry spell. IMG_9483.JPG

The back of the novel is just as loaded (with Terry Pratchett, Orson Scott Card, Robert Silverberg, Ursula K Le Guin, and George R. R. Martin). As a huge fan of a bunch of these authors, getting a first edition of this was huge. The novel debuts “The Hedge Knight” which is the first side story he published, showing Dunk and Egg and their adventures. So far, I have yet to find a first edition of A Game of Thrones or A Clash of Kings, the only two books before this (I do have a first edition of Tuf Voyaging). It is funny to note he wrote a Dance with Dragons was forthcoming, instead of a Storm of Swords that came next. In any case, the novel is cool to have, notwithstanding it is worth $25-$30 despite being a $1 purchase at the thrift store.

As for the Bo Jackson Book? I did it again. Call me the autograph whisperer, but I seemed to have crafted a process to find autographed books at garage sales and thrift shops left and right.The Heisman winner still commands a fanbase and charges around $100 per autograph at conventions. On ebay, this book when signed goes between $39.99 and $60. So it was a pretty good score for 99 cents. Below is the picture of the autograph as I was standing in the middle of the shop looking like a fool.

IMG_9478.JPG

READ ABOUT MY ANNIE HALL SCORE

Game Reviews: Techmo Bowl (NES)

cover_large-1.jpg

It didn’t get more real that this in 1989 in which Techmo Bowl, the first NFLPA licensed game, was released. This was around the same time I began rooting for my team, the Washington Redskins.

Except in this game, I separated loyalty from awesomeness and seldom played with them.

Out of the 12 teams, there was only two real choices in a game that offered two pass plays and two run plays each time, in which I would only use master half of them: The off-tackle run, and the all go pass.

The team I would pick would be the Chicago Bears. Why? Because it had the best player in the game, Walter Payton. He was fast as hell and could rarely be stopped. If he got out in the open, watch out because he was going to take it to the house (and make a ton of players miss) For the pass play, I would roll back and off to the side and throw a bomb down the sideline every time, without seeing the receiver at all. The game had this little highlighted flag at the edge of the screen that told you approximately where the receiver was and you had to have faith to let your players make a play.

That’s what playmakers do.

On the season mode, I would beat it pretty easily. I think I beat the game with half the teams, including the Washington Redskins just to see if I could do it.

The real rivalry, was when I played my father. He used the only team that could really rival the Bears, the Raiders. You see, if you couldn’t play Techmo Bowl with Walter Payton, you would play with Bo Jackson. He was fast a hell too.

I don’t remember the final tally of who won the most. Most of the games would come down to the final possession, or one rare interception from one of my throws … because I’m sure even my father figured out that I ran only two plays in my offensive playbook. It was essentially a 50/50 guess each time.

It was awesome and fun, and I hope to find another copy of it someday.

SEE ANOTHER NES GAME REVIEW